59716 Volunteer

Lee Griffiths skied almost every ski area out west before settling on Big Sky as his home. Like many residents, he is determined to do his part to improve the Big Sky community and the world.

Bettering Big Sky

There is nothing Lee Griffiths does that is not well thought-out. His move to Big Sky years ago was quite researched and intentional. He knew he wanted to escape the rat race of the East Coast and settle in a ski community out west, so he spent an entire season visiting many resort areas.

Sarah “Sippi” Sipe poses for a photo with Gladys Thomas, mother of Lance and Terry Thomas. Gladys celebrated her 93rd birthday in July and has lived in Big Sky with her sons and her daughter-in-law, Mary Goodson, for more than 20 years. Gladys is currently at the Madison Valley Manor recovering from a broken arm as a result of a fall. “She's my favorite person in Big Sky, she's a total rock star, and I love her dearly!!” Sipe wrote to the Lookout in a request to use this image. PHOTO COURTESY SARAH SIPE

Sara "Sippi" Sipe

I asked Sarah “Sippi” Sipe to sit down with me, delay the comfort of her home and cuddles with her cat –Tom Newberry – and to share stories of her abundant volunteer work. We spoke at end of day in the conference room of her accounting office when most people were gone – the faintest tapping of keys on one lonely computer could be heard.

Gaither hopes items past their prime will go to good use somewhere—fruits and veggies could be composted, and according to online sources, milk that is sour but not curdled can be used for making cheese, baking and even facial masks.

Compost anyone?

It kills Big Sky Community Food Bank Operations Manager Sarah Gaither to throw away food. After all, the items she receives are donated with the hope each will go to good use for hungry Big Sky residents.

Sherine Blackford

Get cyber savvy: Local attorneys brief kids about online gaming and social media skills

Ever heard of “Fortnight”? It’s an online multiplayer survival game where players cooperate on mapped-out missions, helping survivors of a storm and battling zombie-like creatures. The game, released in 2017, now has more than a million users—a number of Big Sky’s youth included.

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