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Greg “Carnie” Lisk, co-owner of the Gallatin Riverhouse Grill, has been mentoring in the CAP mentorship program for over five years.

Mentors needed!

I ran into Julie Lisk, youth program coordinator with Thrive, at the joint Gallatin and Madison county commission meeting held at Lone Peak Cinema recently. She was desperate for volunteers, she said.

A proactive approach

About two dozen parents gathered at Warren Miller Performing Arts Center on December 10 to discuss the challenges of raising children in a rapidly changing world. “The was the best attended parent outreach event in the last four years,” Gallatin County deputy and Big Sky School District Resource Officer Travis Earl said.

Big Sky photographer Mike Haring fits right in with this shot of bighorn sheep.

The art of his adventure

Mike Haring stuffed $600 in his pocket and bought a one-way ticket to Europe when he was 21 years old. He stayed for 13 months – surviving by playing music on the streets.

“This was 1985,” he explained. “There were no cell phones; no credit cards.”

Big Horn of the Week

Lone Peak High School senior Myles Wilson has brought a new leadership to the Lone Peak Newscast. His dedication, attention to detail and hard work has been evident in the latest Newscasts. Myles has been instrumental in keeping all members of the cast focused on the importance of the overall quality.

James Clark sketches in preparation for his art show in his place of employment as a tattoo artist, Clendenin Customs Tattoo & Gallery. PHOTO BY JANA BOUNDS

Take a walk

Local artist James Clark intends to traverse the United States not by plane, train, automobile, horse or bicycle. He's traveling via his own two feet – and considers every step a movement toward healing.

Ophir first-grader Braxtin Clark

Miner of the Week

This week's Miner of the Week is first grade student Braxtin Clark. Braxtin arrives to school every day with a positive attitude and ambition to learn. "She is very caring and checks in with all her friends to make sure they are having a good day.

Sarah “Sippi” Sipe poses for a photo with Gladys Thomas, mother of Lance and Terry Thomas. Gladys celebrated her 93rd birthday in July and has lived in Big Sky with her sons and her daughter-in-law, Mary Goodson, for more than 20 years. Gladys is currently at the Madison Valley Manor recovering from a broken arm as a result of a fall. “She's my favorite person in Big Sky, she's a total rock star, and I love her dearly!!” Sipe wrote to the Lookout in a request to use this image. PHOTO COURTESY SARAH SIPE

59716 Volunteer: Sara "Sippi" Sipe

I asked Sarah “Sippi” Sipe to sit down with me, delay the comfort of her home and cuddles with her cat –Tom Newberry – and to share stories of her abundant volunteer work. We spoke at end of day in the conference room of her accounting office when most people were gone – the faintest tapping of keys on one lonely computer could be heard.

Monsters of machines: Multihog snow removal equipment is parked outside of Buck's T-4 conference room as part of the first ever snow removal safety meeting in Big Sky. PHOTO BY JANA BOUNDS

A nod to Bob

Snowblowers are 15,000 pound behemoths, steel monsters with teeth: potential man killers. They are also necessary contraptions to keep a snow community moving.

Teach here, live here

While the Big Sky School District has been successful in recruiting new instructors to its growing schools, it’s still subject to the same issues most Big Sky businesses eventually face—including employee burnout when the commute to and from Bozeman rears its head, often due to the lack of affordable housing options in Big Sky. 

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