Yes, that's a kazoo.KT Tunstall performed during aprés ski prime time at Montana Jack.

How long, really?

KT Tunstall opened her recent sold-out benefit concert at Montana Jack with the song, “It Took Me So Long To Get Here, But Here I Am.” Before starting, she coached the crowd on how to sing along with the chorus, and wasn’t impressed with the initial effort. 

 “That’s very polite,” she quipped to the crowd. “It’s like you’re all wearing suits and ties. You’re not. And you have beer.” 

Tunstall was in Big Sky to raise awareness about climate change and raise funds for the group Protect Our Winters. Four hundred tickets were sold to the last-minute “pop up” show on Friday, March 2. 

The concert coincided with a drumbeat of bad news about rising temperatures in the arctic and dire predictions about the future of skiing and snowboarding—which POW aspires to protect through activism and political action. 

How long do we really have? In a report last month, the New York Times spotlighted the work of the Climate Impact Lab, which predicts if greenhouse gases continue to rise, “The Lake Tahoe area will experience subfreezing temperatures only eight days a year by 2100, 80 percent fewer than the average from 1981 to 2010. Ski season would be essentially dead.”

And just down I-90 at Mount Spokane, a story from March 4 in The Spokesman-Review offered this alert: “New research from Oregon State University indicates that today’s young skiers could see significant changes in snowpack by the time they reach middle age. By the end of the 21st century—when their grandkids or great-grandkids are skiing— temperatures above freezing could cost the ski hill an entire month of snow.”

On stage in Big Sky, ,Tunstall joked about how skiing in her native Scotland involves lots of rocks and ice and exposed heather. The line got a nervous laugh, then Tunstall pulled out a kazoo and started to play. 




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Lone Peak Lookout

235 Snowy Mtn Circle
Big Sky, MT 59716

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