News

Baby, it’s cold outside

The human body is a remarkable machine which alters depending on surroundings. We started asking questions at a recent staff meeting in anticipation of a cold snap: How do locals fair so much better playing in the cold than people from warmer climates? Why do visitors from flatter areas struggle so much with elevation?

Streamside Way winds up to Great Horn Road and Greathorn Ranch. Roads leading to the relatively remote neighborhood were requested by residents of the area to be abandoned, effectively making the roads private. That request was shot down by Gallatin County commissioners in late November.

Road abandon 'No'

Headed south towards Firelight Meadows on Ousel Falls Road it’s easy to overlook Streamside Way, an unassuming road that leads up to a mountainous residential development known as Greathorn Ranch. Likely, not many passersby opt to turn left and head up the hill.

First, first chair! Left to right: Big Sky Resort Mountain Operations Vice President Mike Unruh, Big Sky Resort General Manager Taylor Middleton, Dominik Falkner of Doppelmayr Everett Kircher, President of Boyne Resorts Stephen Kircher, President of Doppelmayr USA Mark Bee, John McGregor of Big Sky Resort, Randy Woolwine, Doppelmayr’s president of sales.

Charging ahead

When Boyne Resorts President Stephen Kircher first set eyes on the completed Ramcharger 8, he said it blew his mind. Sure, Kircher was well aware what the eight-seater would be like – he was the one who decided to pull the trigger and bring the state-of-the-art chairlift to Big Sky.

Grady Chapin

Miner of the Week

This week's Miner of the Week is kindergartner Grady Chapin. Grady is a hard-working student who shows up every day ready to do his best. "He is always excited to learn and perseveres even when things are challenging. He arrives every morning with a smile on his face and always says good morning.

“Après is the best gig in the whole world. Everyone’s coming off the hill, they’re feeling good,” musician Brian Stumpf said of his regular Sunday gig at Scissorbills Saloon. PHOTO BY JANA BOUNDS

Making it on music

It’s easy to recognize that Brian Stumpf hit local celebrity status ages ago. He handed out more high-fives in a 10-minute timeframe before his recent après ski gig at Scissorbills Saloon than most people get to in a year. He’s nonchalant when called out on it.

Greg “Carnie” Lisk, co-owner of the Gallatin Riverhouse Grill, has been mentoring in the CAP mentorship program for over five years.

Mentors needed!

I ran into Julie Lisk, youth program coordinator with Thrive, at the joint Gallatin and Madison county commission meeting held at Lone Peak Cinema recently. She was desperate for volunteers, she said.

A proactive approach

About two dozen parents gathered at Warren Miller Performing Arts Center on December 10 to discuss the challenges of raising children in a rapidly changing world. “The was the best attended parent outreach event in the last four years,” Gallatin County deputy and Big Sky School District Resource Officer Travis Earl said.

Big Sky photographer Mike Haring fits right in with this shot of bighorn sheep.

The art of his adventure

Mike Haring stuffed $600 in his pocket and bought a one-way ticket to Europe when he was 21 years old. He stayed for 13 months – surviving by playing music on the streets.

“This was 1985,” he explained. “There were no cell phones; no credit cards.”

Big Horn of the Week

Lone Peak High School senior Myles Wilson has brought a new leadership to the Lone Peak Newscast. His dedication, attention to detail and hard work has been evident in the latest Newscasts. Myles has been instrumental in keeping all members of the cast focused on the importance of the overall quality.

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