NSAJ

Seth Griggs-Ryan beside Chaplain Raymond Young at his Dec. 3 graduation from treatment in Las Vegas. PHOTO COURTESY OF SETH GRIGGS-RYAN

Community of Seth

Seth Griggs-Ryan was the first Not So Average Joe, partly thanks to his kind disposition and wry humor and partly because of his quirky pursuit to be the human billboard of Big Sky – he negotiated free food and drinks from area establishments by getting their logos tattooed on his arms.

A well-travelled family, Mark, Ece, nine year old Sky and eleven year old Zeyli Walkup have made Big Sky their home. PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK WALKUP

The long road home

Teamwork seems intrinsic to Mark Walkup, the new general manager of the Hungry Moose: from college football to the cheerleading squad at Auburn University to playing the bass guitar professionally for popular punk bands. He has travelled nearly every nook and cranny of the nation – that is part of the reason he wants to be in Big Sky.

Samantha Mize-Honatke with her three-year-old son Trey who “gets into everything” to the point that she and her husband have nicknamed him “Trey-nado”. PHOTO COURTESY SAMANTHA MIZE-HONATKE

Life by the numbers

Samantha Mize-Honatke once dipped her toe in water outside of Montana. She tried Phoenix for a year, “but the water was too hot,” she joked. Sure, she missed the Montana mountains and seasons and had a palpable distaste for all the concrete in the city, but people were what really made her pack up and head back to her Gallatin Gateway roots.

Sean Doherty competing in the longest one day race in the world in the single speed division. The race is 25 hours long and happens in Utah during the time change. PHOTO COURTESY SEAN DOHERTY

Surviving the city

Sean Doherty says that if he had not run away from the city he would be “a very different, miserable person.”

New York City was fun for him in his mid-20s, but it would not have been sustainable. It may have taken years or decades for him to realize that he just did not quite fit. He was in the wrong environment.

“If we ever have another pandemic, I’ll be ready,” Gibson said. PHOTO COURTESY OF DEBORAH GIBSON

‘Invisible heroes’

Writer’s note: My mom, the laboratory QA safety specialist at the state lab, used to walk my sister and I through the halls and different components of the lab when we were little. I thought Debbie was the coolest woman then, especially after I started hearing about all the ultras she ran, and still feel that way now.

Al Malinowski is grateful his friend advised him to accept a job at the resort 26 years ago. Big Sky is where he met his wife. PHOTO COURTESY AL MALINOWSKI

The beautiful life of Al Mal

Al “Al Mal” Malinowski is amiable and functions with a kind of ease that is found in people who help shape things. In his case, he helped shape Big Sky. Still, he gets a little uncomfortable when asked to talk about himself and would rather discuss other people, projects and the lost history of the community.

Jake, Christine, Leif, Ava and Vivienne Yergensen came to Big Sky after Jake was offered a position as pastry chef at the Yellowstone Club. PHOTO COURTESY CHRISTINE YUGO-YERGENSEN

Making life sweet

By all indications, Christine Lugo-Yergensen is tireless in her pursuits. She has a sort of vibrancy – in fact she exudes joy. With three kids under seven, a new catering business and volunteer pursuits that keep her hopping – including the Friendsgiving at the Wilson Hotel – her reservoir of energy likely comes in handy.

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